Teaching

Courses taught at the University of Zurich

  • Bio222 “Molecular Evolution and Phylogenetics” (Fall semester, current; 6 credits). Course coordinator. Teaching contribution: 80%. Elective, specialized block course for 3rd and 4th year students. Course structure: 3.5 weeks, 4 days/week, lectures in the morning, labs in the afternoon.

  • Bio221 “Plant-Insect Interactions” (Fall semester; 2008-12; 6 credits). Teaching contribution: 50%. Elective, specialized block course for 3rd and 4th year students. Course structure: 3.5 weeks, 4 days/week, lectures in the morning, labs in the afternoon.

  • Bio226 "Introduction to ecological genomics and molecular adaptation" (Two 2-hour guest lectures; Fall semester; 2012-15; 6 credits).

  • Bio232 "Macroecology, Niche Evolution and Climate Change" (Two 2-hour lectures; Fall semester; 2012-2014; 6 credits).

  • Bio554 (survey course) "Topics in Evolutionary Biology (Fall semester; 1 credit). Teaching contribution: one 2-hour lecture on my research in biogeography or plant breeding system. Course for Ph.D. students in the graduate program of Evolutionary Biology.

  • Bio761 “Research Internship in Systematic Botany”. Undergraduate students doing short research internships in my lab.

  • Bio511 “Master research in Systematics and Evolution”

  • Bio131 “Biological Systematics” (2004-06; 3 credits). Teaching contribution: two 2-hour lectures. Mandatory, introductory course for 1st year students.

  • Bio113 “Evolution” (Fall semester 2010; 3 credits). Teaching contribution: two 2-hour lectures and coordination of the corresponding labs. Mandatory, introductory course for 1st semester students.

  • “Speciation and phylogeny: Evolution at the micro- and macro-level” (2000-06; 6 credits). Course coordinator. Teaching contribution: 50%. Elective, specialized block course for 3rd and 4th year students.

  • “Challenges in Plant Sciences” (Fall semester 2010-13; 2 credits). Teaching contribution: one introductory lecture to plant evolutionary studies. Course for MS and Ph.D. students of the Plant Science Center.

  • “Diversity of Angiosperms” (Spring 2009). Teaching contribution: one 2-hour lecture. Survey of angiosperm systematics for undergraduate and graduate students at the Institute of Systematic Botany.

  •  “Workshop on Phylogenetic Analysis for High School Science Teachers” (December 2008): Two-hour lecture on phylogenetic methods; coordinated by the Life Science Center.

  • “Introduction to Phylogenetics” (2004-06; 2 credits). Course coordinator. Teaching contribution: 100%. Elective, specialized course for Ph.D. students at the Plant Science Center. Course structure: 3 full-days with lectures and computer labs.

  • “Spectrum in Plant Sciences”. Teaching contribution: Introductory lecture to current research in plant evolution. Ph.D. students of the Plant Science Center.

  • Research journal club: meetings with graduate students of the Institute of Systematic Botany to discuss current literature.

  • Lab meetings: regular meetings with my research group to discuss research progress.

Courses taught at other Universities

  • “Frontiers in Speciation” (September 2010). Teaching contribution: 2-hour lecture on the role of floral traits in plant evolution. Summer school for Ph.D. students funded by the European Science Foundation. Coordinator: Ole Seehausen. Eawag, Kastanienbaum (Switzerland).

  • “Workshop on Phylogenetic Analysis” (Spring 2004): 3-day intensive workshop on phylogenetic methods for the Italian Ph.D. program in Plant Systematics and Evolution. University of Cosenza, Italy.

  • “Systematic Botany” (once per year, 1996-1999). Course coordinator; teaching contribution: 100%. Full semester course, 3 hours of lectures per week, coordination and development of lab practicals. University of Alaska-Fairbanks.

  • Training of graduate and undergraduate students, visiting scientists, and high school teachers in molecular systematics methods at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks.

  • “General Botany” (every semester: 1989-1991). Teaching contribution: responsible for lab practicals and discussion sessions as Ph.D. teaching assistant. Large introductory course for undergraduate students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  • General Botany for majors and non-major

Updated 20 June 2017